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Here's a little quiz to test your resourcefulness. 

 

INSTRUCTIONS:  Drawing just two boxes, put each of the pigs (yes, they're pigs!!) in its own pen.

 
  Pig Test  
  If you can't figure it out and absolutely must know the answer, email us and we'll tell you the secret.  
     
 


The soul should always stand ajar,
ready to welcome the ecstatic experience.


Emily Dickinson


 

 
     

Another little brain teaser for you.  


Don't think about it too much...

s

 This is an unusual paragraph. I'm curious
 how quickly you can find out what is so
 unusual about it? It looks so plain you
 would think nothing was wrong with it! In
 fact, nothing is wrong with it! It is unusual
 though. Study it, and think about it, but you
 still may not find anything odd. But if you
 work at it a bit, you might find out! Try to do
 so without any coaching!

s


Again, if you need help, email us!
d
s


This is your brain on creativity.
Visualization and Memory Exercise
by Dr. Tony Alessandra
Used with permission.

 

Visualization is a primary technique for storing information in your memory. Doing it regularly also is the fastest way to manifest your goals. This is an interesting exercise to exercise your visualization and memory muscles.

INSTRUCTIONS
  Get a mental picture of a two-inch cube.
  Paint the top of the cube red.
  Paint the bottom blue.
  Paint the remaining sides white.
  Now slice the cube vertically in half.
  Now slice it vertically in half again, at a right angle to the first cut.
  Now, cut the cube in half horizontally, like a layer cake.

You now have divided the two-inch cube into a number of one-inch cubes. Can you answer the following questions?

A. How many sides does each 1-inch cube have?
B. How many 1-inch cubes are there?
C. How many 1-inch cubes have at least one white side?
D. How many cubes have at least 1 red side and at least 1 white side?
E. How many unpainted sides does each 1-inch cube have?

 

Answers: Answer key

 

How did you do?

Analysis: This exercise tested your ability to construct and manipulate mental images. Even though it was a relatively easy exercise in terms of complexity, it required a high level of concentration in listening to and perceiving the directions. Practice similar visualization exercises to keep your mental imaging muscles in good shape.

     
  Some favorite creativity quotes  
     


If you hear a voice within you say, "You cannot paint,"
then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced.


— Vincent Van Gogh


 

     
  12 traits of highly creative people 12 secrets of highly creative people  
 

 Flexibility

 Emotional sensitivity

 Receptivity to new ideas

 Tolerance of ambiguity

 Fluency of ideas

 Preference for disorder

 Intuitiveness

 Originality

 Perseverance

 Openness to risk

 Curiosity

 Playfulness

  ?    Procrastination


From
Living Your Life Out Loud: How to Unlock Your Creativity and Unleash Your Joy, by Salli Rasberry and Padi Selwyn

Curiosity about life in all of its aspects, I think,
is still the secret of great creative people.

– Leo Burnett
    SECRET1     

  SECRET 2     

  SECRET 3     

  SECRET 4     

  SECRET 5     

  SECRET 6     

  SECRET 7     

  SECRET 8     
                     


  SECRET 9     
                     


  SECRET 10   
                     


  SECRET 11   

  SECRET 12
Acknowledge your creative self.

Honor your inspirations.

Follow your fascinations.

Surrender to your creative cycles.

Commit to self-focus.

Conquer your saboteurs.

Consult with guides.

Select empowering partnerships and alliances.

Transcend rejections and roadblocks.

Live in abudnace with positive priorities.

Subtract serenity stealers.

Plan to achieve your goals.
 

Click here to see a selection of articles about creativity.
      From The 12 Secrets of Highly Creative Women, by Gail McMeekin  
     
 

Let's Dispell Some Common Myths about Creativity
s
 
 

Myth Number 1     Creativity is only for the artistic elite.Creativity myths busted - right here, right now.

Myth Number 2     You have to suffer to be creative.

Myth Number 3     Creativity is not manly.

Myth Number 4     Women’s work is not as creative as men’s.

Myth Number 5     Creative people are self-absorbed.

Myth Number 6     Creativity is a full-time job.

Myth Number 7     Creative people don’t have good relationships.

Myth Number 8     Creative people are irresponsible children.

Myth Number 9     The older you get, the less creative you become.

Myth Number 10   All creative people are alcoholics or drug addicts.

Myth Number 11   Creative people are neurotic, bordering on suicidal.

Myth Number 12   Creative people are loners – single, childless, living in a cave.

Myth Number 13   You must be born with an artistic gift to be creative.

Myth Number 14   You have to live in an ivory tower – or next to a pond – to be creative.

Myth Number 15   Creative people are reckless and neglectful of their own physical well-being.

 

While elements of these myths may be true for some creative people, they are not absolutes. Nor does every creative person necessarily experience even one of these myths.

 

From Creating from the Spirit: Living Each Day as a Creative Act, by Dan Wakefield

 
 
 
  Top 40 Creativity Killers  
  If you want to stop your creativity before it even has a chance to take hold, practice batting these low-energy, victim phrases around, particularly in a group setting.

OK, that's a little harsh. We're all human and sometimes negative stuff escapes our mouths before we can contain it. Be prepared for that instance with a positive affirmation to replace the killer phrases. Something like "I am abudnantly creative," or "I am a creative genius." Then, as soon as you catch yourself uttering one of the negatives, cancel that thought and replace it with your creative affirmation.
 
     
 

1.   “Yes, but . . .”

2.   “We tried that before.”

3.    “That’s irrelevant.”

4.    “We haven’t got the manpower.”

5.    “Obviously, you misread my request.”

6.    “Don’t rock the boat!”

7.    “The boss (or competition) will eat you alive.”

8.    “Don’t waste time thinking.”

9.    “Great idea, but not for us.”

10.  “It’ll never fly.”

11.  “Don’t be ridiculous.”

12.  “People don’t want change.”

13.  “It’s not in the budget.”

14.   “Put it in writing.”

15.   “It will be more trouble than it’s worth.”

16.   “That isn’t your responsibility.”

17.   “That’s not in your job description.”

18.   “You can’t teach an old dog new tricks.”

19.   “Let’s stick with what works.”

20.   “We’ve done all right so far.”

21.   The boss will never go for it.”

 

22.   “It’s too far ahead of the times.”

23.   ... laughter ... 

24.   ... suppressed laughter ... 

25.   ... condescending grin ... 

26.   ... dirty looks ... 

27.   “You can’t fight city hall.”

28.   “I’m the one who gets paid to think.”

29.   “What will people say?”

30.   “Let's form a committee to look into that.”

31.   “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

32.   “You’ve got to be kidding.”

33.   “No!”

34.   “We’ve always done it this way.”

35.   “It’s all right in theory, but . . .”

36.   “Be practical!”

37.   “Do you realize what kind of paperwork that
        will create?”

38.   “Because I said so.”

39.   “I’ll get back to you on that.”

40.   ... silence ... 

 
 


From What a Great Idea! Key Steps Creative People Take, by Charles “Chic” Thompson

 
     
 
 
 

Howard Gardner's 7 Intelligences

 

Howard Gadner's theory of multple intelligences posits differentiates intelligence into various specific modalities, rather tha viewing it as a single ability. According to Gardner, each of these cognitive skills has only weak correlations among them.

 

Gardner explains that "we are all able to know the world through language, logical-mathematical analysis, spatial representation, musical thinking, the use of the body to solve problems or to make things, an understanding of other individuals, and an understanding of ourselves. Where individuals differ is in the strength of these intelligences ... and in the ways in which such intelligences are invoked and combined to carry out different tasks, solve diverse problems, and progress in various domains." Students — and perhaps society as a whole — would be better served if learning disciplines were presented in a variety of ways and learning could be assessed through a variety of means.

 

Here are brief descriptions of the intelligences, along with specific skills that inhabit each, as well as potential career interests:

 
     
 

LINGUISTIC INTELLIGENCE (“word smart”) is the ability to use words and language. These learners have highly developed auditory skills and are generally elegant speakers. They think in words rather than pictures.

 
     
 

SKILLS

  listening

  speaking

  writing

  story telling,

  explaining

  teaching

  using humor

  remembering information

  understanding the syntax and meaning of words

  convincing someone of their point of view

  analyzing language usage

 

  POTENTIAL CAREER INTERESTS

  poet

  journalist

  writer

  teacher

  lawyer

  politician

  translator

 
     
 

Logical/Mathematical Intelligence (“number/reasoning smart”) is the ability to use reason, logic and numbers. These learners think conceptually in logical and numerical patterns making connections between pieces of information. Always curious about the world around them, these learner ask lots of questions and like to do experiments.

 
     
 

SKILLS

  problem solving

  classifying and categorizing information

  working with abstract concepts to figure out the relationship of each to the other

  handling long chains of reason to make local  progressions

  doing controlled experiments

  questioning and wondering about natural events

  performing complex mathematical calculations
 
working with geometric shapes

 

  POTENTIAL CAREER INTERESTS

  scientists

  engineers

  computer programmers

  researchers

  accountants

  mathematicians

 
     
 

Spatial intelligence (“picture smart”) is the ability to perceive the visual. These learners tend to think in pictures and need to create vivid mental images to retain information. They enjoy looking at maps, charts, pictures, videos, and movies.

 
     
 

SKILLS

  puzzle building

  reading

  writing

  understanding charts and graphs

  a good sense of direction

  sketching

  painting

  creating visual metaphors and analogies

  manipulating images

  constructing

  fixing

  designing practical objects

  interpreting visual images

 

  POTENTIAL CAREER INTERESTS

  navigators

  sculptors

  visual artists

  inventors

  architects

  interior designers

  mechanics, engineers

 
     
 

Bodily/Kinesthetic intelligence (“body smart”) is the ability to control body movements and handle objects skillfully. These learners express themselves through movement. They have a good sense of balance and eye-hand co-ordination. (e.g. ball play, balancing beams). Through interacting with the space around them, they are able to remember and process information.

 
     
 

SKILLS

  dancing

  physical co-ordination

  sports

  hands on experimentation

  using body language

  crafts

  acting

  miming

  using their hands to create or build

  expressing emotions through the body

 

  POTENTIAL CAREER INTERESTS

  athletes

  physical education teachers

  dancers

  actors

  firefighters

  artisans

 
     
 

Musical intelligence (“music smart”) is the ability to produce and appreciate music. These musically inclined learners think in sounds, rhythms and patterns. They immediately respond to music either appreciating or criticizing what they hear. Many of these learners are extremely sensitive to environmental sounds (e.g. crickets, bells, dripping faucets).

 
     
 

SKILLS

  singing

  whistling

  playing musical instruments

  recognizing tonal patterns

  composing music

  remembering melodies

  understanding the structure and rhythm of music

 

  POTENTIAL CAREER INTERESTS

  musician

  disc jockey

  singer

  composer

 
     
 

Interpersonal intelligence (“people smart”) is the ability to relate and understand others. These learners try to see things from other people’s point of view in order to understand how they think and feel. They often have an uncanny ability to sense feelings, intentions and motivations. They are great organizers, although they sometimes resort to manipulation. Generally they try to maintain peace in group settings and encourage cooperation. They use both verbal (e.g. speaking) and non-verbal language (e.g. eye contact, body language)  to open communication channels with others.

 
     
 

SKILLS

  seeing things from other perspectives

  listening

  using empathy

  understanding other people’s moods and feelings

  counseling

  cooperating with groups

  noticing people’s moods, motivations and intentions

  communicating both verbally and non-verbally

  building trust

  peaceful conflict resolution

  establishing positive relations with other people

 

  POTENTIAL CAREER INTERESTS

  counselor

  salesperson

  politician

  business person

 
     
 

Intrapersonal intelligence (“self smart”) is the ability to self-reflect and be aware of one’s inner state of being. These learners try to understand their inner feelings, dreams, relationships with others, and strengths and weaknesses.

 
     
 

SKILLS

  recognizing their own strengths and weaknesses

  reflecting and analyzing themselves

  awareness of inner feelings, desires and dreams

  evaluating their thinking patterns

  reasoning with themselves

 • understanding their role in relationship to others
 

  POTENTIAL CAREER INTERESTS

  researchers

  theorists

 • philosophers
 
     
  Creative inspiration  
     
 

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Laura
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